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Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation


The Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) is a non-profit organisation that focuses on the prevention of all forms of violence and healing its consequences. The primary goal of the CSVR is to use an integrated approach of research, advocacy, and interventions to build reconciliation, sustainable peace and a human rights culture in South Africa, Africa and globally. Our work is rooted in an analysis of the shifting forms of conflict and violence within societies enduring a political transition.

Specifically, the Centre’s work includes peacebuilding, human rights, community-level reconciliation, criminal justice reform, trauma studies and support, transitional justice, victim empowerment, and violence prevention with a specific focus on the prevention of gender-based, youth, and racist or xenophobic violence.

Our Vision
The Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation is committed to the promotion of peaceful societies based on democracy, human rights, social justice, equality, and human security.

Our Mission
CSVR aims to contribute to the building of violence-free societies and the promotion of sustainable peace and reconciliation by means of research, advocacy and other interventions and through establishing strategic partnerships with organs of the state, NGOs, community organisations, individuals and international allies.

Transitional Justice Programme
The Transitional Justice Programme is one of a number of programmes within CSVR. This programme continues to evaluate the impact of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission as well as conduct advocacy and intervention on ongoing issues related to the need for truth, justice, reconciliation and healing within South Africa and to share these lessons and experiences with partners in other countries.

TJP works on the African continent with local civil society partners to create forums of reciprocal learning for African practitioners in order to further the development of context specific programmes on transitional justice that are locally informed and address identified needs.

Currently the program is running work in areas which include: memory and memorialisation; ex-combatant reintegration; civil society capacity-building; and research on violence in transition. It also founded and houses the Oxford University Press publication International Journal of Transitional Justice.

 
Copyright © African Transitional Justice Research Network 2006-2010. Site by Interiority.